A Bamboo Project – The Bamboo Industry in the U.S.


bamboo-project-united-states

Bamboo has been deemed the new “wonder plant” and with good reason. Bamboo impacts the lives of over 1.5 billion people worldwide, has over 1500 uses that we know about now, is highly sustainable, sequesters up to 40% more Co2 than a forest of trees the same size, and is stronger than steel. 

Bamboo is the fastest-growing woody plant in the world, capable of growing up to four feet a day. Most of it is grown organically, and in most locations requires no irrigation, pesticides, or fertilizers. Because of its fast growth, good mechanical properties, low price and abundant availability, bamboo is widely recognized as a promising resource for sustainable manufacturing.

An acre of bamboo can sequester 25 tons of carbon dioxide per year, compared to only 6 tons from a young forest. Bamboo is so effective in this role that Japan and the Netherlands are planting vast tracts of bamboo toward their carbon credit. Much of America’s lands are suitable for growing bamboo. After being imported as early as 1828 into the United States, bamboo grows wildly mostly concentrated in the Southern U.S. and Eastern seaboard. There are additional successful farms as far north as Ohio, Oregon and Washington.

Additional benefits of bamboo:

  • Bamboo requires only one third of the water than cotton does. There is much less carbon associated with growing bamboo such as operating tractors in harvesting and maintenance than cotton.
  • Bamboo is stronger than steel and more durable than wood. (withstands up to 52,000 Pounds of pressure psi) It can be used as a composite, structural beams, flooring, scaffolding, supports, housing, and concrete reinforcement.
  • Bamboo is flexible. It can be used in virtually any application such as bike frames, domes, and other products.
  • Bamboo filters soil of contaminants and prevents soil erosion.
  • This plant has a use in every industry.

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The need for a bamboo industry in the United States.

Provided all legislation and forecasts stay on course during this election a perfect storm is brewing for the entrance of bamboo as a mainstream crop.

Read more about the effects the bamboo industry will have on the political, environmental, and industrial sectors of the U.S. here.

(Above is an excerpt of an article by Eric Stevens. NOT AFFILIATED IN ANY MANNER WITH LAMBOO)

                                                                                                                                                                                                

Mr. Stevens is a prime example of the growing number of innovative leaders and advocates that are taking strong stands on environmental and societal issues. The fact of the matter is that with our rapidly growing society, the traditional way of building and supporting our society is unsustainable and drastic measures must be taken, and sooner rather than later. With the forests and non-renewable resources quickly depleting, our leaders will eventually be forced to look at alternative options. Advocates like Stevens are creating a great framework for this radical political and social shift by promoting the use of bamboo in the U.S. and internationally. Although bamboo will not solve all environmental issues, it can play a major role in the global struggle and movement towards sustainable living that upcoming decades will undoubtedly bring.

CTW-structural-system-

Lamboo is playing a large part in the use of bamboo materials in the U.S. through our Laminated Veneer Bamboo (LVB) panels in nearly every industry and market. Our materials are being incorporated all across the U.S. (and internationally) for architectural applications including residential, industrial, commercial, and retail markets. Learn more about our products at the links provided below.

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Vital tool to support timber use in construction


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Aiming to position timber as a first-choice ‘primary and preferred construction material’, Wood First Plus will provide evidence of the credentials of timber from cradle to grave.

Work has begun to create a free online information hub containing all of the environmental and design data necessary for project managers, designers and architects to specify timber as a first choice material.

The hub will be called Wood First Plus, and has been organized by Wood for Good, the UK timber industry promotion and sustainability group, supported by Scottish Enterprise, the Timber Trade Federation, Forestry Commission Scotland and the Timber Research and Development Association.

Building on the arguments of the Wood First campaign, which aims to position timber as a first-choice ‘primary and preferred construction material’, Wood First Plus will provide evidence of the credentials of timber from cradle to grave.

The project is a result of on-going consultation with timber industry organizations and external stakeholders, including contractors groups, architects, professional institutions and many others.

All stakeholders will be able to access whole-life information on timber products free of charge through a dedicated website, managed by Wood for Good.

Individual timber companies will be able to use this data as a basis to develop specific environmental product declarations (EPD) for their products to guarantee their sustainability and traceability.

David Hopkins, Wood for Good’s head of external communications, said: “With the built environment sector now firmly focused on delivering low-carbon, sustainable buildings, being able to quantify the environmental impact of construction materials is becoming increasingly important.

“The aim for Wood First Plus is to provide empirical evidence on the performance of specific wood products, making it easier for construction professionals wishing to build with timber to do so, and helping them to adhere to industry regulations. We look forward to announcing the first set of results later this year.”

The use of wood in construction brings numerous benefits for the environment, the economy, and the community. Trees absorb CO2 and store it, and when used in construction form an important store of atmospheric carbon, helping to limit global warming.

With sustainably managed forests and increased use of timber in construction it is an endlessly renewable process.

Additionally, wood has good thermal performance properties, increasing the energy efficiency and operational performance of a building. Timber framed buildings are often quicker to erect saving on construction cost.

The organization is also calling for a ‘Wood First’ stipulation in planning guidance that would require wood to be considered, where feasible, as the primary construction material in all publicly-funded new build and refurbishment projects, from housing to bridges to schools.

PE International has been engaged to oversee the collection, analysis and review of all life cycle assessment (LCA) data for a wide range of timber and timber products that will be used in the online tool.

The company has extensive experience in the construction materials sector and in working with the timber industry, having previously completed a major LCA project on US hardwood lumber for the American Hardwood Export Council.

(Excerpt of article from Link2. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                

As more and more organizations return to the basics and look for sustainable options in their projects, the demand for renewable resources such as wood will grow exponentially. Often overlooked by mainstream architecture, is an ancient building material that can meet these demands, bamboo. As a rapidly renewable, high performance, material bamboo can be integrated with other bio based (or renewable) materials to provide truly sustainable buildings and products. Bamboo has a wealth of environmental and performance attributes that make it ideal for the construction and retail markets.

Other articles of interest:

Wood’s New Wave
Evolving Building Codes: Wood Revolution
The Virtues of Bamboo
Bamboo Architecture and Construction
What Can Bamboo Do About CO2?
Bamboo As A Carbon Offset: INBAR Does The Math
Can bamboo tackle environmental and poverty concerns?
In Africa’s Vanishing Forests, the Benefits of Bamboo
Nigeria Can Generate 24 Million Jobs From Bamboo Production

Bamboo As A Carbon Offset: INBAR Does The Math


b2ap3_thumbnail_inbar-international-network-for-bamboo-rattan-logoCarbon credits are certificates that represent a reduction of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These reductions are accomplished by projects designed to prevent the generation of greenhouse gases: they range from windmill farms to geothermal energy projects to biomass alternative energy initiatives to reforestation.

INBAR has taken the reforestation project and put their own bamboo spin on it for Chinese companies. Carbon credits in the form of bamboo plantation investments are now available for companies.

With so many options available, with so many projects, with traditional hardwood forestry as an option, why invest in bamboo?

  • It grows up to four feet per day so it can be harvested every 4-5 years as opposed to the 25-70 years it can take for traditional hardwoods to mature.
  • It removes CO2 from the air and produces over 30% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of hardwood trees.
  • Below the ground, bamboo’s roots help prevent soil erosion.
  • Bamboo improves soil quality. The roots remove excess nitrogen and because the plant grows readily with no use of pesticides, fertilizers or herbicides, there is no ground pollution involved.
  • Environmentalists are researching bamboo’s apparent ability to soak up excess nutrients in waste water as an answer to waste issues.

With all these environmentally-friendly qualities, what has kept bamboo off the carbon offset table?

Very simply, a lack of math. Because bamboo plants have very different growth characteristics than trees, different mechanisms were needed to measure their carbon outputs. And before now, there was no way to determine how much carbon a bamboo plant can convert.

Thanks to INBAR, the China Green Carbon Foundation and the Zhejiang Agriculture, a methodology now exists that can calculate the amount of carbon available in the massive bamboo plantations in China. (Well, they actually only account for 2.8% of China’s total forest area but considering the land mass of China, that is a significant chunk.)

“This is a really big breakthrough,” said Yannick Kuehl, a climate change expert at INBAR who helped develop the technique. “This means that now bamboo is recognized as carbon offset, and as a tool for climate change mitigation measures.”

According to Kuehl, more than 10 Chinese companies have pre-ordered carbon credits and the money they pay will go towards planting new bamboo forests in China. In a country plagued with environmental issues, utilizing the sustainable bamboo plant is a positive step.

(Excerpt of article from Green Earth News. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Possible LEED Credits 

  • MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials
  • b2ap3_thumbnail_bamboo-forest_20130626-193234_1IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials
  • ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design (Environmentally Preferable Material)
  • ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design (Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact)
  • FSC Certification – Available Upon Request

Learn more about Lamboo

Applicable LEED Points

What Can Bamboo Do About CO2?


Efforts to thoroughly study the role that plants play in climate change mitigation are increasing. Most researchers focus on the promise of large, leafy forest trees to help remove carbon from the atmosphere. This is because, generally speaking, the bigger the plant, the more CO2 it absorbs – and trees are the most obvious large plant species. However, there are some very large non-tree plants in the world and increasing evidence points to a surprising grassy climate change warrior: bamboo.

One species of bamboo, the Guadua Angustifolia, found in Venezuela, Ecuador, and Colombia, has been shown to grow up to 25 meters in height and 22 centimeters in diameter, with each plant weighing up to 100 kilograms. This doesn’t match the stature of many trees, but it is still big enough to be significant. It is not all about size, however. How fast a plant grows has a part in determining how much CO2 it can absorb in a given time. In this respect, bamboo wins hands-down: it grows faster than many trees, growing up to 1.2 meters per day. In fact, bamboo holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s fastest growing plant.

Bamboo’s other advantage is that it has great strength and flexibility, making it an ideal low-cost building material in many parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, areas where it is native. This means that bamboo in a plantation can regularly be chopped down and used to build houses and other structures, where the carbon remains sequestered for an average of 80 years, and that the plantation will recover quickly due to the fast growth rate. Because of this, the World Bank recently financed a project in Ecuador proposed by the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), an intergovernmental organization dedicated to improving the livelihoods of the poor producers and users of bamboo and rattan. The project is called ‘Elevated bamboo houses to protect communities in flood zones’ and has so far succeeded in developing and implementing techniques to construct ecological flood-resistant housing for low-income families using a type of bamboo that is native to Ecuador.

(READ FULL STORY)

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Ethiopia Leads the Bamboo Revolution


ADDIS ABABA , Apr 8 2013 (IPS) – A combination of an abundance of bamboo and eager foreign investment is making Ethiopia a frontier for the bamboo industrial revolution in Africa, according to this country’s government.

“Ethiopia has the resources, the investment, a rapidly-developing manufacturing industry and a strong demand for our bamboo products from foreign markets. We have what we need. The expansion of Africa’s bamboo sector has begun,” Ethiopia’s State Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development Mitiku Kassa told IPS.

Ethiopia currently has the largest area – one million hectares – of commercially untapped bamboo in East Africa, making it attractive to investment partners from the bamboo industry. However, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development told IPS that they were unwilling to disclose any figures on the bamboo economy, but added that there had been no formal bamboo economy in Ethiopia until 2012.

“The market potential of bamboo in Europe is massive. We believe that there can be a reliable and effective supply chain built here in Ethiopia to create a bamboo manufacturing industry,” said Felix Boeck, an associate engineer at Africa Bamboo PLC, a public-private partnership set up with Ethiopian partners and supported by the German Development Cooperation in 2012. The partnership plans to invest 10 million euros over the next five years in their Ethiopia-based manufacturing operation.

In comparison to soft wood trees that can take 30 years to reach maturity, bamboo is a fully mature resource after three years, making it commercially and environmentally sustainable.

Sub-Saharan Africa has three million hectares of bamboo forest, around four percent of the continent’s total forest cover. Ethiopia plans to increase its bamboo cover to two million hectares over the next five years.

Small-scale Ethiopian bamboo farmers like Ghetnet Melaku are enthusiastic to participate in the development of the bamboo sector, if investment in its expansion is inclusive of small farmers.

“I am just making enough money to subsist by producing bamboo for the local craft market and, if I had the opportunity, I would like to increase my capacity for skilled production and a better financial return,” Melaku told IPS.

The International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR) is an intergovernmental organization that assists governments, businesses and local communities to identify innovative bamboo-based opportunities for human development.

It is helping sensitise African governments to the high potential of bamboo as a versatile and renewable resource that can generate sustainable development. According to INBAR, one billion people around the world use bamboo in their daily lives as housing material, fencing and food, and in craft production, etc.

“If properly managed, this highly versatile resource could spur economic growth in a world export market valued at two billion dollars in 2011, reduce deforestation and cut carbon emissions,” INBAR director general J. Coosje Hoogendoorn told IPS.

Deforestation has ravaged Africa’s environment – the carbon emissions from burning timber on the continent alone are expected to reach 6.7 million tonnes by 2050. As 90 percent of the population in sub-Saharan Africa use firewood or charcoal to cook, the development of an alternative resource like bamboo has become essential.

“Sourcing fuel for cooking food is integral to food security,” said Hoogendoorn. “Rice, maize and pulses all require heat to become edible. Renewable alternatives like bamboo can help minimize deforestation caused by the logging of soft timber wood for cooking fuel and house materials.”

Ethiopia’s government has prohibited the creation of charcoal from burnt wood for retail and is actively advocating sustainable alternatives such as bamboo.

“Bamboo is a major untapped resource for Ethiopia. We are pushing to grow and conserve our bamboo resources. We are starting to work with farmers and enterprises to encourage and develop this sector for the country’s economic and environmental benefit. We are working to undo unsustainable practices and advocate new alternatives,” State Minister Kassa told IPS.

Although Ethiopia has one of the highest deforestation rates in Africa, it has increased its national forest cover to seven percent from three percent a decade ago, out of an original 40 percent. Hoogendorn said that governments needed to make financial resources available to enterprises that wished to develop Africa’s bamboo industry.

“We want governments to put structures in place that offer financial support such as micro finance and that remove any hindrance for investors in the bamboo market, so that when companies want to set up a bamboo industry they have access to financial support,” he said.

High demand for Ethiopia’s agricultural output such as bamboo can drive growth and development for the country’s poor if it generates employment opportunities and remains non-exploitative towards farm workers and the land, said research fellow Steve Wiggins from the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). The ODI is the United Kingdom’s leading independent think tank on international development and humanitarian issues.

“It is good if there is another source of demand for farm produce, so long as the economics of bamboo offer decent returns to land and labour, equitable deals can be struck in the supply chain, and the crop is environmentally sustainable,” Wiggins told IPS.

While bamboo production in Asia carries connotations of unsustainable forestry practices and illegal logging, INBAR is working to share lessons learned and bring bamboo production in Africa’s market up to the highest standards.

“Sustainable management of a country’s bamboo sector is extremely important to the future of a country’s market, especially if that country is wanting to export its products to the European market where laws stipulate conformity to high sustainability standards,” Hoogendoorn said.

As the industrial development of bamboo in Africa is in its infancy, investors have until recently been cautious about ploughing large amounts of money into a market whose dividends are relatively unknown.

“We are ready for the same industrial revolution in bamboo development that Ethiopia is currently experiencing,” Andrew Akwasi Oteng-Amoako, the chief research scientist at the Forestry Research Institute in Ghana, told IPS.

He lamented that although his West African country had an abundance of bamboo, it failed to secure the same investment as Ethiopia.

“We anticipate a revival of investment interest in Ghana’s bamboo industry in the near future thanks to Ethiopia’s success,” Oteng-Amoako said.
(Excerpt of article from Inter Press Service. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Bamboo not only creates jobs for residents of the country of origin but has the potential in creating thousands of jobs in secondary fabrication and installation in those regions using the material.

Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as a structurally stable renewable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50) and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Learn more about the amazing attributes of bamboo here.

 

Learn more about Lamboo

What is Lamboo?

Certifications

Product Information

Research

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

Wood’s New Wave


Wood derived from responsibly managed forests is gaining traction among eco-friendly designers as the preferred building material primarily because the source is renewable and greatly offsets a project’s initial carbon footprint.

Unlike steel and concrete, both of which generate varying amounts of carbon during production, trees absorb carbon from the atmosphere as they grow and permanently sequester it in their fibers unless they rot or burn. Concurrently, advances in software and manufacturing technologies, coupled with innovative assembly techniques, are making it technically possible to quickly and economically design and build iconic shapes and large-scale buildings with wood-based products. Europe and, more recently, Canada are leading the way, but proponents believe that the approach will become more widespread as manufacturers ramp up production capability and building officials reassess outdated codes.

The caveat is that the wood must be sourced from responsibly managed forests. “We are not talking about clear-cutting,” stresses Peter Busby, managing director of the San Francisco office of Perkins+Will. He notes that the relatively recent increase in availability of sustainably harvested woods at reasonable prices makes environmentally minded practitioners feel more comfortable about specifying wood today.

Perkins+Will developed a highly organic design based on a native orchid for the new visitor center at the VanDusen Botanical Garden in Vancouver.

Resource Management

Because natural lumber is limited in size, and the long-term preservation of our forests is yet another environmental priority, architects working on larger projects are increasingly turning to engineered-wood products to obtain the structural dimensions they need while lowering a building’s carbon footprint.

According to Karsh, it can take hundreds of years for a tree to grow large enough to supply solid-wood timber for traditional post-and-beam construction, whereas it takes about 40 years for a tree to supply the 2x6s that are typically used to manufacture glue-laminated timber, or glu-lam, an engineered-wood product that has been on the market for decades. And it takes only about 10 to 15 years to grow the trees used to produce wood chips for laminated-strand lumber (LSL), another common engineered product. When the life cycle of timber production is shortened, our forests become more productive. “If we manage our forests responsibility, which includes generating products that have a shorter renewal period, we don’t risk depleting our forests,” states Karsh.

Engineered woods have many other benefits as well, notes Nabih Tahan, chief sustainable officer of CREE Buildings in San Francisco. For example, they can be manufactured to desired performance standards; are very stable, so they will not twist or shrink; and can be cut to very fine tolerances so components will fit together exactly in the field.

Looking Ahead

Proponents of large-scale wood construction cite outdated building codes as one of the biggest barriers to this new approach. Most codes limit the height of wood-constructed buildings out of concerns about fire. But these codes were written primarily with stick-frame construction in mind; that functions very differently than mass-timber construction in a fire. While thin wood members will burn quickly, the exterior of massive timber will burn for a bit but then create a layer of char that insulates the remaining interior wood from damage. Furthermore, many of today’s fire codes were written decades ago, before fire sprinklers and computer-controlled fire-monitoring systems were developed. “Those advances change how we look at fire,” notes Karsh. Practitioners working on large-scale wood projects in Canada indicate that they must currently provide equivalency reports to satisfy the code, but Karsh believes that will likely change with the next iteration of Canada’s National Building Code, scheduled for 2015.

Another barrier, at least in North America, is a shortage of manufacturers. According to Podesto of Woodworks, only three companies make structural-grade CLT in Canada, and none in the United States.

But Karsh is not deterred, noting that it took decades for steel and concrete to evolve into the modern systems we use today. “Modern wood construction is 100 to 120 years behind. Only in the last 20 years have we developed it into a truly modern construction material.” He believes the product will become more sustainable in the years ahead. “The idea of building high-rise timber may seem crazy now, but it won’t in five to 10 years.”

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Nancy B. Solomon, AIA from Architectural Record. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

As the world leader in the industrialization of bamboo, Lamboo is striving to implement Laminated Veneer Bamboo (LVB), a rapidly renewable construction material. Through species selection, patented adhesives, and manufacturing processes Lamboo is able to create bamboo panels and components that far exceed traditional timber’s performance in nearly every aspect.

Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as a environmentally friendly and structurally stable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Testing and forecasting by experts has led to Bamboo being referred to as “the next super material” due to it’s amazing attributes and resiliency.

Lamboo Structural Component

Learn more about Lamboo

What is Lamboo?

Certifications

Product Information

Research

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

From “Light Green” to Sustainable Buildings


As more people move to urban areas in search of economic opportunities, the number of buildings that are needed to house them continues to rise. It is estimated that by 2030, an additional 1.4 billion people will live in cities, of which 1.3 billion will dwell in cities of developing countries. The increasing number of buildings has long-term impacts on both the environment and natural resources. Fortunately, a variety of policy tools hold promise for promoting sustainability in buildings, according to Kaarin Taipale, contributing author of the Worldwatch Institute’s State of the World 2012: Moving Toward Sustainable Prosperity.

The buildings in which we live and work are a major consumer of energy, responsible for some 30—40 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions, a similar share of total solid waste, and 12 percent of all fresh water used. With the rate of urbanization reaching record levels, there will be more construction and buildings than ever before.

The introduction and enforcement of effective public policies can be the cheapest and most efficient method for promoting sustainability in the construction and use of buildings, Taipale says. The goal is to radically reduce buildings’ environmental footprint and long-term negative social and financial effects.

In search of a “best policy” in her State of the World 2012 chapter, “From Light Green to Sustainable Buildings,” Taipale suggests considering four dimensions in a policy package:

Process. It is important to take into account the entire life-cycle of a building, from design and construction to its use and demolition. Some posit that designating a sustainability coordinator for the planning and construction period should be a requirement for any building permit. An additional tool for the time span when the building is being used is a mandatory “maintenance diary,” documenting the various ways the building is serviced and renovated.

Performance. What matters most is how well the entire building performs, not how its individual parts might adhere to requirements. Setting minimum energy performance standards, for example, makes more sense than specifying the thickness of a thermal insulation. A growing set of core criteria has evolved by which to measure building performance in terms of resource use. These consider greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water use, and waste production, among others. Policies can require that certain minimum performance standards and benchmarks be met.

Sustainable Infrastructure. Buildings need efficient infrastructures that save resources and provide everyone equal access to basic services such as fresh water and sanitation, energy, communication, and public transport. The quality of these infrastructures determines the level of urban sustainability. National water legislation, for example, can help secure access to safe drinking water for urban residents for a fair price.

Resource Use. Sustainability of resource use considers financial, human, and natural resources. Shifting toward a greater reliance on renewable energy is the most efficient method to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and mitigate climate change. Such a shift also helps reduce local air pollution and health hazards. We need higher energy performance requirements for new construction and refurbishment, however, because it does not make much sense to waste renewable energy in buildings that are not energy efficient.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Environmental News Network . NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)


Lamboo Technologies’ manufacturing processes use 15% less embodied energy than that of engineered wood, and 300% less embodied energy than aluminum and steel. Lamboo, on average, is 20% more stable than wood in moisture and temperature changes, 10 times stronger than wood in tension and 3 times stronger mechanically. Additionally bamboo produces 30% more oxygen than a like-sized timber forest while sequestering 35% more carbon and only requires 6-8 years to reach maturity. All of these outstanding attributes make bamboo a great resource for the construction industry.

LEED Credits available through Lamboo integration.

Incorporating Lamboo (LVB) Laminated Veneer Bamboo into projects can earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification under the following:

  • MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials
  • IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials
  • ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design
    (Environmentally Preferable Material)
  • ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design
    (Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact)
  • FSC Certification – Available Upon Request

Learn more about our certifications here.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us   866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

Can bamboo tackle environmental and poverty concerns?


HONG KONG, China (CNN) — Bamboo, considered to be the world’s fastest-growing woody plant, could be a key component in lifting thousands of people in the developing world out of poverty.

According to the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), as many as 1.5 billion people currently “depend in some way on bamboo and rattan,” and several organizations are now investigating how growing bamboo in economically deprived areas can boost the income of the residents, particularly small-scale farmers.

One of them is Hanoi, Vietnam-based Prosperity Initiative (PI). Many people can escape poverty by increasing bamboo production in rural areas and by linking local communities with domestic and foreign buyers, the non-governmental organization believes.

PI aims to bolster the Mekong region’s bamboo industry sufficiently enough to bring 750,000 people out of poverty by 2020. It sounds a tall order, but Tim de Mestre, head of Prosperity Initiative’s Mekong bamboo program, believes it is “both realistic and achievable.”

“Income poverty can only be solved by sustainably increasing household incomes,” de Mestre said. “The poor have two assets they can use to do this: their land, to grow commodities, and their labor.”

China currently produces 80 percent of the world’s bamboo and consumes 60 percent of it, according to PI. Smaller and poorer bamboo-producing countries such as Vietnam are in a prime position to “out-compete China” by supplying industries with raw materials at lower prices, De Mestre said.

But why would growing bamboo increase income levels any more than any other type of crop? Its advantage, proponents say, is its versatility and how quickly it can grow.

Bamboo is a genuinely renewable resource which grows extremely fast, is incredibly strong and has a vast number of practical uses — particularly in the building industry.

Around 1 billion people live in bamboo houses, according to INBAR. Deforestation of tropical forests and illegal logging will also make people search for more sustainable alternatives in the future, such as bamboo.

PI’s strategy is to refocus the bamboo industry on “higher-value products”: That is, to concentrate on producing larger items, such as flooring, furniture or building materials.

Such a tactic could drive up the value of bamboo in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, benefiting small-bamboo farmers, as well as those finding employment in the bamboo production industry.

PI says its model is already working in Vietnam, and claims bamboo price increases from 2005-2007 have already been responsible for lifting 20,000 Vietnamese out of poverty. The price of Chinese bamboo has also been boosted in recent months by the strengthening yuan.

News like that will be welcome for poor bamboo farmers as the numbers for industrial bamboo products such as flooring are particularly appealing for them, de Mestre said.

“Typically 60 percent of the sector’s output value is raw material cost.”

That means for every $1 million worth of bamboo products produced, $600,000 of it goes to the farmers growing the raw bamboo, he said.

The global bamboo industry is currently worth around $11 billion per year and is tipped to reach $15-$20 billion per year by 2018, according to PI. The market for industrial bamboo products is currently only valued at around $500 million a year, but PI estimates it could grow to $4 -5 billion in the next 10 years.

For the bamboo industry to thrive, however, it needs to find large export markets.

Currently, demand for Vietnamese bamboo products is domestic-driven. That may take some time, said Darrel DeBoer, a California-based architect who is one of the biggest proponents of bamboo usage in buildings and structures in the United States.

“It’s definitely a different way of thinking than most people are accustomed to here,” DeBoer said. From an environmental-friendly perspective, bamboo homes are attractive, said DeBoer, but not enough people in the United States are aware of the option.

“The building industry is very slow to change and you kind of have to drag them along,” he said. “We are at the very early phase of basically letting people know that it is possible.”

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Rachel Oliver of CNN. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)


 More key benefits of bamboo –

  • Produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area.
  • Growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50).
  • Root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo

Advantages of Lamboo Structural grade materials –

  • On average 20% more stable than hardwoods and up to 40% more stable than softwoods such as pine or Douglas Fir.
  • 10 times stronger than wood in tension and 3 times stronger mechanically.
  • Our manufacturing processes use 15% less embodied energy than that of engineered wood, and 300% less embodied energy than aluminum and steel.
  • Resistance to pests and termites (engineered process and high silica content).
  • Resistance to mold and fungi cultivation.
  • Low V.O.C. adhesives, no off-gassing when sanding, profiling, and handling materials.

LEED Credits available through Lamboo integration

Incorporating Lamboo (LVB) Laminated Veneer Bamboo into projects can earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification under the following:

  • MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials
  • IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials
  • ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design(Environmentally Preferable Material)
  • ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design(Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact)
  • FSC Certification – Available Upon Request

Learn more about our certifications here.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us   866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison

The Virtues of Bamboo


Bamboo. It’s been around us all our lives. It’s something we have so much of that we don’t even think about it anymore.

But, after reading architect Rosario Encarnacion-Tan’s book  “100 Things about Building with Bamboo,” it turns out bamboo is something we should begin thinking very seriously about.

It’s precisely because we have so much bamboo that we have to think more about it. It’s an abundant, everyday resource so underutilized we haven’t even begun to realize the possibilities of.

Tan’s book is a great bamboo primer.

Bamboo is sustainable. Several species —123, to be exact, out of a total of 550 worldwide species—grow profusely in our tropical Philippine landscape. Although it has to be manually transplanted, bamboo regenerates so quickly that it seems to multiply before our eyes.

It is environmentally friendly, grows easily even in subsoil or sandy soil, and is good for reforestation or erosion control.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by of . NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Lamboo Logo WASHOUT

Lamboo, Inc., a world leader in the industrialization of bamboo and innovative material technology, is leading the trend of sustainable development by utilizing the super material, bamboo. As the main manufacturer of structural grade bamboo, Lamboo is committed to cultivating this material to its full potential for use as a replacement over traditional and depleted resources as an ultra-renewable alternative. Bamboo is not only a rapidly renewable resource in the form of engineered LVB (Laminated Veneer Bamboo), but also features performance attributes far greater than any other plant species. Superior performance, rapid replenishment, and environmental benefits make bamboo the ideal building material.

Incorporating Lamboo (LVB) Laminated Veneer Bamboo into projects can earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification under the following:

  • MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials
  • IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials
  • ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design
    (Environmentally Preferable Material)
  • ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design
    (Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact)
  • FSC Certification – Available Upon Request
For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us  866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison

Evolving Building Codes: Wood Revolution


Pushing the boundaries of innovative wood design and construction

There is a quiet revolution taking place within the design community. After a prolonged emphasis on concrete and steel for buildings other than homes, design professionals are using wood to great effect in a growing number of non-residential and multi-family building types—in applications that range from traditional to innovative, even iconic. Some are driven by wood’s cost effectiveness while others cite its versatility or low carbon footprint, but their collective path has been made possible by building codes that increasingly recognize wood’s structural and performance capabilities, and the continued evolution of wood building systems and techniques.

When the International Building Code (IBC) was introduced in 2000, it consolidated three regional model building codes into one uniform code that has since been adopted by most jurisdictions. It increased the possibilities for wood construction by (among other things) recognizing additional fire protection techniques, consolidating the maximum allowable areas and heights from the three legacy codes into one (thus increasing what’s allowable in some jurisdictions), and allowing the use of wood in a wider range of building types. In subsequent versions of the IBC, even more opportunities have been created where additional fire protection features are used.

Even so, the pioneering nature of building design is such that there are always architects and engineers seeking to push beyond the conventional, and it is common for project teams to require—and be granted—variances for designs not covered in the code that can nonetheless be justified on a case-by-case basis.

Wood-construction

This CEU will examine the use of wood both within the current IBC and through building projects that have further pushed the boundaries of wood design and construction.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Continuing Education Center. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Lamboo Logo WASHOUTTimber is increasingly being recognized for its potential as a sustainable building material in an era where designers are looking for alternatives to the non-renewable resources traditionally used. We must start using options that we can replenished over time rather than using a finite resource; however, effective in terms of application and cost it ultimately may be. Many species of timber have attributes that make it ideal for construction and even though it is renewable many of these species take 25-50 years to reach maturity and require expensive and damaging replanting, threatening many weakened ecosystems. Due to these concerns, Bamboo is being used in many applications where timber has in the past providing remarkable strength, performance, and stability far exceeding any other natural materials (in addition to having a growth rate of 6-8 years). Testing and forecasting by experts has led to the coining of the term “the next super material” due to Bamboo’s amazing attributes and resiliency.

As the world leader in the industrialization of bamboo, Lamboo is striving to make this prediction a reality by manufacturing the world’s first certified structural grade bamboo component, laminated veneer bamboo (LVB). Through species selection, patented adhesives, and manufacturing processes Lamboo is able to create bamboo panels and components that far exceed wood’s performance in nearly every aspect.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison