LEED: Changing the built world for the better


The sustainable (green) building movement is a major trend in design and construction of commercial and public buildings. The United States Green Building Council has coordinated the establishment and evolution of a national consensus effort to provide the industry with the tools necessary to design, build and operate buildings that deliver high performance inside and outside the building footprint.

They have developed the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design standard, which is a rating system based on optimum site selection and sustainability, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere optimization, materials and resources (renewable and recyclable base), and indoor environmental quality. The LEED process is a systematic approach where building design and construction needs to meet various requirements in the five segments to reach a certain rating level, and LEED certification is voluntary. Whether it be a school, library, government building or your office, you probably have been in a LEED building.

All people in the building industry are looking for ways to adapt to this changing environment in the private and public sectors. We know that buildings consume annually more than 30 percent of the nation’s total energy, and more than 60 percent of the electricity. Research has demonstrated that green design measures in new buildings reduce operating costs, enhance building marketability, increase worker productivity and reduce potential liability resulting from indoor air quality problems.

(READ FULL STORY)

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What Can Bamboo Do About CO2?


Efforts to thoroughly study the role that plants play in climate change mitigation are increasing. Most researchers focus on the promise of large, leafy forest trees to help remove carbon from the atmosphere. This is because, generally speaking, the bigger the plant, the more CO2 it absorbs – and trees are the most obvious large plant species. However, there are some very large non-tree plants in the world and increasing evidence points to a surprising grassy climate change warrior: bamboo.

One species of bamboo, the Guadua Angustifolia, found in Venezuela, Ecuador, and Colombia, has been shown to grow up to 25 meters in height and 22 centimeters in diameter, with each plant weighing up to 100 kilograms. This doesn’t match the stature of many trees, but it is still big enough to be significant. It is not all about size, however. How fast a plant grows has a part in determining how much CO2 it can absorb in a given time. In this respect, bamboo wins hands-down: it grows faster than many trees, growing up to 1.2 meters per day. In fact, bamboo holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s fastest growing plant.

Bamboo’s other advantage is that it has great strength and flexibility, making it an ideal low-cost building material in many parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, areas where it is native. This means that bamboo in a plantation can regularly be chopped down and used to build houses and other structures, where the carbon remains sequestered for an average of 80 years, and that the plantation will recover quickly due to the fast growth rate. Because of this, the World Bank recently financed a project in Ecuador proposed by the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), an intergovernmental organization dedicated to improving the livelihoods of the poor producers and users of bamboo and rattan. The project is called ‘Elevated bamboo houses to protect communities in flood zones’ and has so far succeeded in developing and implementing techniques to construct ecological flood-resistant housing for low-income families using a type of bamboo that is native to Ecuador.

(READ FULL STORY)

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Evolving Building Codes: Wood Revolution


Pushing the boundaries of innovative wood design and construction

There is a quiet revolution taking place within the design community. After a prolonged emphasis on concrete and steel for buildings other than homes, design professionals are using wood to great effect in a growing number of non-residential and multi-family building types—in applications that range from traditional to innovative, even iconic. Some are driven by wood’s cost effectiveness while others cite its versatility or low carbon footprint, but their collective path has been made possible by building codes that increasingly recognize wood’s structural and performance capabilities, and the continued evolution of wood building systems and techniques.

When the International Building Code (IBC) was introduced in 2000, it consolidated three regional model building codes into one uniform code that has since been adopted by most jurisdictions. It increased the possibilities for wood construction by (among other things) recognizing additional fire protection techniques, consolidating the maximum allowable areas and heights from the three legacy codes into one (thus increasing what’s allowable in some jurisdictions), and allowing the use of wood in a wider range of building types. In subsequent versions of the IBC, even more opportunities have been created where additional fire protection features are used.

Even so, the pioneering nature of building design is such that there are always architects and engineers seeking to push beyond the conventional, and it is common for project teams to require—and be granted—variances for designs not covered in the code that can nonetheless be justified on a case-by-case basis.

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This CEU will examine the use of wood both within the current IBC and through building projects that have further pushed the boundaries of wood design and construction.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Continuing Education Center. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Lamboo Logo WASHOUTTimber is increasingly being recognized for its potential as a sustainable building material in an era where designers are looking for alternatives to the non-renewable resources traditionally used. We must start using options that we can replenished over time rather than using a finite resource; however, effective in terms of application and cost it ultimately may be. Many species of timber have attributes that make it ideal for construction and even though it is renewable many of these species take 25-50 years to reach maturity and require expensive and damaging replanting, threatening many weakened ecosystems. Due to these concerns, Bamboo is being used in many applications where timber has in the past providing remarkable strength, performance, and stability far exceeding any other natural materials (in addition to having a growth rate of 6-8 years). Testing and forecasting by experts has led to the coining of the term “the next super material” due to Bamboo’s amazing attributes and resiliency.

As the world leader in the industrialization of bamboo, Lamboo is striving to make this prediction a reality by manufacturing the world’s first certified structural grade bamboo component, laminated veneer bamboo (LVB). Through species selection, patented adhesives, and manufacturing processes Lamboo is able to create bamboo panels and components that far exceed wood’s performance in nearly every aspect.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison

The Evolution of Green Construction


The homes we live in create a huge carbon debt before the proud new owners ever cross the threshold. But even worse is the fact that they are built in such a way that they will continue to do harm once they are inhabited, thanks to inadequate insulation that leaves homeowners cranking the heat and AC, not to mention a complete lack of sustainable energy options. Luckily, there is a bright spot on the horizon, and it comes in the form of green construction.

The average construction site could be described as less than eco-friendly, to put it mildly. The materials used for such projects often include natural resources like wood and stone that are not harvested in a sustainable manner. Both logging and mining operations are notorious for damaging the environment through their efforts and doing very little to clean up afterwards. Further, these materials are frequently shipped all over the globe, creating massive amounts of pollution along every step of the way, not to mention the manufacturing processes, which produce even more pollution and waste.

And then, of course, there is the construction itself, which continues this assault on the environment. In short, the homes we live in create a huge carbon debt before the proud new owners ever cross the threshold. But even worse is the fact that they are built in such a way that they will continue to do harm once they are inhabited, thanks to inadequate insulation that leaves homeowners cranking the heat and AC, not to mention a complete lack of sustainable energy options. Luckily, there is a bright spot on the horizon, and it comes in the form of green construction.

Over the last several years, a rapidly growing awareness of serious environmental issues (pollution, deforestation, global warming, habitat loss, species extinction, etc.) has led the public to call for alternatives to the products and services they use on a daily basis. And since many consumers start in the home, the demand for green options on this front has grown considerably. In response, the construction industry has begun to realize a shift in practices, not as a whole, but at least in part, with companies springing up that provide eco-friendly options in the building process.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by EcoCltr.)

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Environmental concerns have initiated efforts by organizations of all kinds from the private or public sector as well as government bodies to develop renewable practices and materials to replace declining or unsustainable resources. Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as an environmentally friendly, structurally stable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50) and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Lamboo’s LVB (Laminated Veneer Bamboo) also represents one of the highest performing building materials available to the industry. Learn more about Lamboo’s attributes here.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison

 

Sustainable Business and Green Building Projects


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In an effort to protect the environment, many companies have begun developing sustainable business practices.  By implementing green and sustainable practices, many have found that they can make choices that help the planet as well as their profits. Sustainable business is a relatively new concept for many companies, but it has grown in popularity and use over the past decade and considerable advances are expected for the future.

Sustainable business requirements

Not just any company that chooses to recycle is meeting sustainable business standards. There are certain requirements that must be met in order for a company to be considered part of the green business world.  These include:

  • The business must be considered more environmentally friendly than traditional businesses
  • Sustainability is at the forefront of business decision making
  • An observable commitment to green practices has been implemented across the board
  • Services and products offered from the business are environmentally friendly or meet the public demand for sustainable products.

Because green practices, standards, and demands are always changing, it is important for businesses that employ efforts to stay green to keep up with changing technology.

One area that has been growing even more than others is green building and construction. In many instances, by creating homes, offices, and public buildings that are environmentally friendly, the costs of operating said buildings can be extremely low, and many companies are moving to this form of building.

Green building standards

The United States Green Building Council (USGBC) is the government organization in charge of overseeing the green design and function of buildings across America. By constructing buildings with efficient and supportive designs, the USGBC believes that they can help minimize the energy crisis and create jobs.

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) concept has changed several aspects of the way green construction and sustainable business practices are run. This international standard is offered as a reward to the building owners who operate their companies within certain standards of excellence in this field. With LEED in mind, many property owners are able to implement sustainable business practices, green construction, efficient building design, and maintain daily operations in an environmentally friendly manner.

Similarly, the United States Business Council for Sustainable Development (US BCSD) is available to help improve environmental awareness within industry, government projects, and business ventures. This non-profit organization is part of a worldwide group of councils that are partnered with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.  These organizations work across the globe to promote sustainable business initiatives on a worldwide scale, but their impact can be felt locally.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by the Triple Pundit. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Traditionally, building practices have focused on large scale, low cost production with little regard as to how this could be maintained in the future. This lead to many natural resources becoming strained due to over use and mismanagement. In an era of rising populations and demand for the buildings and structures to support it there becomes the need for not only more efficient building practices but also materials sustainable enough to provide a long term solution. With a maturity rate of 6-8 years (versus 25-50 with timber) Bamboo is just the resource the industry has been searching for. Bamboo is a remarkably strong plant that is not only able to rapidly replenish but also regrows without planting, saving an enormous cost associated with timber in terms of capital and energy.

Additionally, incorporating Lamboo (LVB) laminated veneer bamboo into projects can earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification under MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials, IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials; ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design (Environmentally Preferable Material), and ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design (Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact).

*Please refer to USGBC for information regarding project requirements

For more information about the advantages of Bamboo please visit our sustainability page.

 

  For questions regarding Lamboo, our products, or to schedule an interview please
visit our website at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

Nigeria Can Generate 24 Million Jobs From Bamboo Production


Director of Forestry Department Ministry of Environment, Mr John Auta, has said that Nigeria can generate N28.6bn annually from bamboo production as well as create over 24 million jobs.

He said the management of bamboo forest would generate large-scale employment through harvesting, collection, transportation, storage, processing, utilization and marketing of products which would be replicated in Nigeria.

Speaking to LEADERSHIP at the weekend, he said: “The comparative advantage for Nigeria to adopt bamboo as tool for employment generation and rural development is not in doubt, because of the large pool of unemployed youths. With this, over 24 million jobs can be created and the country can get to generate N28.6bn annually too.

“The availability of indigenous bamboo species that would thrive well even in poor or degraded soil in many parts of the country is another advantage to Nigeria.”

He also advised Nigerians to commence the propagation of Bamboo to reduce overbearing demand on timber products, adding that dependence on timber had posed a serious threat to timber production.

He said the department was already reaching out to relevant bodies to achieve the goal of cultivating bamboo and other non timber products and added that the Nigerian forests were lying fallow, waiting to be explored in areas that would positively affect the people.

He said: “Nigeria is blessed with bamboo resources which grow on both private and state forest lands in all the southern rain forest states up to some derived savanna states in the North-central states of Nigeria.

“Bamboo has high potential for contributions to achieving sustainable forest management when it is optimally and efficiently utilized for producing substitutes for wood production and increases incomes for rural lively hoods,” he said.

He announced that Nigeria became a member of the International Network for Bamboo and rattan (INBAR) to actualize the goal of achieving the bamboo production in the country.

According to him, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) had undertaken a project formulation mission for the development of project proposal on bamboo and rattan processing in Nigeria.

He said the purpose of the project was to promote the development of bamboo and rattan value chain in West Africa.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Leadership. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Environmental and social concerns have initiated international efforts to search for and create sustainable methods in our society. With declining resources and increasing populations there is the need for new materials for building and of course more opportunities for employment. It is clear that bamboo can be that renewable resource to be used in the next era of architecture and product development. Much like all natural resources bamboo must be protected and preserved as it is the most plausible solution to replace diminishing supplies of timber. Lamboo, Inc. is working closely with both private and government agencies internationally to ensure that bamboo resources are managed properly so that this remarkable resource will be there for the future.

  For questions regarding Lamboo, our products, or to schedule an interview please
visit our website at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

In Africa’s Vanishing Forests, the Benefits of Bamboo


In the district of Asosa, the land is thick with bamboo. People plant it and manage the forests. They rely on its soil-grabbing roots to stabilize steep slopes and riverbanks, cutting erosion. They harvest it to burn for fuel, to make into charcoal sticks to sell to city dwellers and to build furniture.

Asosa is not in China, not even in Asia. It is a district in the west of Ethiopia, on the Sudanese border. To many people, bamboo means China. But it’s not just panda food — mountain gorillas in Rwanda also live on bamboo. About 4 percent of Africa’s forest cover is bamboo.

Soon it may be much more. Bamboo may provide a solution to a very serious problem: deforestation. In sub-Saharan Africa, 70 percent of the people cook their meals over wood fires. The very poorest cut down trees for cooking fuel; those slightly less poor buy charcoal made from wood in those same forests. Every year Africa loses forest cover equal to the size of Switzerland. Terence Sunderland, a senior scientist at the Indonesia-based Center for International Forestry Research, said that in southern Africa, even trees that can be used for fine carving, such as ebony and rosewood, are being cut down and made into charcoal.

Deforestation starts a vicious circle of drought and environmental decline. Burning wood releases the carbon stored inside. And deforestation accounts for at least a fifth of all carbon emissions globally. As tree cover vanishes, the land dries out and the soil erodes and becomes barren — a major reason for Ethiopia’s periodic famines.

Hundimo Dedere owns and manages a plantation of African highland bamboo in Southern Ethiopia that was used as a model for modern bamboo cultivation and management training.

How does bamboo improve on hardwood? Cut down a hardwood tree and it’s gone. It will take several decades for another to grow in its place; it can take a century for a forest to grow back after cutting. But bamboo is a grass, not a tree. Under the right conditions, it can grow a full meter a day — you can literally watch it grow. It is also fast maturing. A new bamboo plant is mature enough to harvest after three to six years, depending on the species. Most important, bamboo is renewable. Unlike hardwood trees, bamboo regrows after harvesting, just as grass regrows after cutting. After it is mature, bamboo can be harvested every single year for the life of the plant.

Bamboo has other advantages. Its roots grab onto soil and hold it fast. Plant bamboo on a steep slope or riverbank and it prevents mudslides and erosion. And bamboo is parsimonious with Africa’s most precious resource: water.

“In Africa you want everything,” said Dr. Chin Ong, a retired professor of environmental science at the University of Nottingham in England, who was formerly a senior scientist at the World Agroforestry Center in Nairobi. “You want firewood, you want to reduce erosion, to maintain the water supply, generate cash and employment. Bamboo comes the closest — it gives you the most things.”

In the last five years or so, Ong said, Ethiopia has realized that bamboo is a more profitable and greener solution. INBAR’s program is a four-year project financed by the European Commission and the Common Fund for Commodities, a United Nations organization. The technology comes from China. The project provides bamboo seedlings and trains people to manage bamboo plantations.

Because bamboo requires few nutrients, it can grow in soil inhospitable to other plants — not only does it thrive there, it can reclaim the land so other plants can thrive, too. Its roots leach heavy metals from the soil, hold the soil together and draw water closer to the surface. One example is a project in Allahabad, India, to reclaim land whose topsoil had been depleted by the brick industry. In 1996, an INBAR project planted the land with bamboo. Five years later, villagers could farm the land again. Dust storms — a local scourge — were greatly reduced. The bamboo also helped raise the water table by seven meters. In 2007, the project won the global Alcan Prize for Sustainability.

Bamboo’s tensile strength makes it a good construction material, and it is also used for furniture, flooring and textiles, among other things.

In some ways, the challenge in Africa is not to introduce bamboo, but to persuade people and governments that it has commercial uses. “We’ve taken policymakers from Africa to China and India where bamboo used in everyday life — and there’s still very poor adoption,” said Ong.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Tina Rosenberg of the New York Times. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Lamboo strives to protect and promote this remarkable resource by working with various international organizations to ensure that the bamboo used in our products is sourced from responsibly managed bamboo plantations and nurseries. Additionally all bamboo used for Lamboo products come from a select list of bamboo species that is not used as a food source by wildlife. If you want to learn more about Lamboo’s commitment to sustainability, please contact us here.

For questions regarding Lamboo, our products, or to schedule an interview please
visit our website at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

‘Green buildings’: From LEED to ‘net-zero’


“Green buildings” are structures that comply with sustainable practices throughout their life cycle – from construction, operation, maintenance, renovation and demolition. Though perhaps born in the energy crisis of the 1970’s, the green construction idea has found new urgency recently in relation to climate issues. Gaining more popularity, it is a now a key element in social measures that aim to lessen carbon footprints.

Green buildings use less water, generate energy savings, conserve natural resources, produce less waste and offer healthier spaces for its tenants, far from a conventional building’s features. Generally, they are designed to ease the sore impacts of the infrastructure both on human health and the environment.

More and more stakeholders are getting attracted to the concepts and practices of green buildings, and this has led to the creation of standards, codes and rating schemes by several organizations across different countries. These aid government regulators, developers and consumers in constructing green buildings with assurance.

Green building rating tools such as the United States’ Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design; the United Kingdom’s Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method; Japan’s Comprehensive Assessment System for Built Environment Efficiency; and Malaysia’s Green Building Index, among others, help users find out how green a building is.

They recognize and credit buildings that observe green design in categories like location and site maintenance, water conservation, energy efficiency, building materials sustainability and even occupants’ comfort and health. The number of credits given generally indicates to what level a building achieves its set goals.

The LEED standard of the United States Green Building Council is touted as the most prominent of the green building rating schemes and even as having spearheaded the “modern green building movement,” according to the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials, a green industry advocate.

The race to green the buildings

In the race to develop “greener” buildings, countries are taking their concrete steps to be successful.

In the United States, President Barrack Obama took the move to the national level by issuing a memorandum in 2011 that urged all commercial buildings to be at least 20 percent more energy efficient by 2020. The president pledged to invest $4 billion to pave the way for energy upgrades in both federal and private buildings through the Better Buildings Challenge.

Among those that took the challenge was the iconic 81-year-old Empire State. Its ongoing retrofit is said to be the largest of its kind to date in the country, expected to significantly cut emissions by 105,000 metric tons over the next 15 years and reduce energy use by over $4.4 million every year. Overhaul plans for the 102 storey-skyscraper include upgrades of its 6,500 windows, new heating and cooling systems that automatically adapt to the temperature, insulation of the building space, improvement of its existing control system and installation of Internet-based system for occupants’ energy monitoring.

In Asia, countries are also working hard to keep up. China, which rivals the United States in the amount of emissions it sends to the atmosphere, is overhauling the architecture of its buildings. The 128-storey Shanghai Tower, when completed in 2014, will not only stand to be the tallest building but significantly will benchmark the green revolution in the country. It features wind turbines, a complex rainwater collection system, two envelope layers that wrap nine interior sky gardens and an ingenious design that will ease lateral loads from wind and reduces the necessary structural steel by over 20 percent.

India, on the other hand, has been vocal about its intentions to become one of the global leaders in green buildings by 2015. It has been making intensive efforts in greening the buildings across the country – ranging from home projects, factory buildings and LEED-certified buildings in India. To date, the Indian Green Building Scorecard shows that there are about 267 certified sustainable buildings existing, including some hotels, shopping centers, office spaces and state infrastructure such as the Indira Gandhi International Airport Terminal 3.

Net-Zero Buildings: The next big thing in green construction

No doubt, green buildings are booming, as venture capitalists generously invested over $4 billion on them since 2000, another report by Lux Research showed.

The study also found out that the first wave of green building start-ups has reached its maturity, and now these investors want something new and better technologies that will further improve green buildings.

“Early VC investors are looking for exits for the first wave of successful green buildings start-ups and the seeds of the next crop are being sown in on-site generation and sustainable materials,” said Ryan Castilloux, Lux Research analyst.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by EcoSeed. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

In this new era of green construction the industry will have to search and develop innovative practices and materials to replace traditional forms that are no longer sustainable. Bamboo is a example of one of these new ultra renewable resources that will be looked towards to meet the burden of demand in our expanding society.

Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as a environmentally friendly structurally stable renewable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50) and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Learn more about the amazing attributes of bamboo here.

Additionally incorporating Lamboo (LVB) laminated veneer bamboo into projects can earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification under MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials, IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials; ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design (Environmentally Preferable Material), and ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design (Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact).

*Please refer to USGBC for information regarding project requirements

  For questions regarding Lamboo, our products, or to schedule an interview please
visit our website at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999
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“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
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Blog by: Dustin Dennison

ASTM 11a 5456 – Inclusion of Laminated Veneer Bamboo (LVB) as a Structural Composite Lumber Product


Founded in 1898, ASTM International has grown into a globally recognized leader in the development and delivery of international voluntary consensus standards. Today, over 12,500 ASTM standards are used around the world to improve product quality, enhance safety, facilitate market access and trade, and build consumer confidence.

The 2012 Annual Book of ASTM Standards has one historic addition under “Evaluation of Structural Composite Lumber Products” as it lists laminated veneer bamboo (LVB) as a certified product for structural applications under ASTM 11a 5456. The D07 orchestration of the inclusion of LVB in ASTM Standards has been a goal Lamboo Incorporated President Luke Schuette and Bruce Craig, Director of Certifications have been working towards since 2007.

Craig, with over 32 years of experience in the field of engineered wood product research and development specializes in product certifications, product development, and quality assurance for engineered wood products. Through his efforts and that of Schuette this inclusion marks the first bio-based structural material addition in around 30 years.

“Sustainability is becoming more and more of a focus in commercial construction. Now architects and engineers will be able to specify possibly the most ecologically friendly material to ever be integrated into the most respected international standard.” Said Luke Schuette, Architect, and Chairman of ASTM task group D07.02.03.

Lamboo structural grade components

D5456 is a standard specification for evaluation of structural composite lumber products that is intended for use as an engineering material for a variety of end-use application. (ASTM standards, D5456) Schuette, chairman of the task group ASTM D07.02.03 along with Craig, a 22 year ASTM member, have drafted and revised standards to be set forth, for the future use of Bamboo as a structural application. This specification recognizes the complexity of structural glued products.

This certification is a major step forward in the transition from finite building materials such as aluminum to rapidly renewable resources in the construction and architectural industries. Bamboo has always been touted for its remarkable attributes to grow and replenish much more rapidly than traditional forms of timber (6-8 years) but this certification also showcases bamboo’s superior strength and performance. The necessity for transition from less renewable sources such as steel, aluminum, and even timber is a reality that the industry must come to terms with.

For questions regarding Lamboo, our products, or to schedule an interview please
visit our website at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999
“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

 

 

Boom in bamboo buildings has green benefits


GIRARDOT, Colombia — Forget steel and concrete. The building material of choice for the 21st century might just be bamboo.

This hollow-stemmed grass isn’t just for flimsy tropical huts any more it’s getting outsized attention in the world of serious architecture. From Hawaii to Vietnam, it’s used to build everything from luxury homes and holiday resorts to churches and bridges.

Boosters call it “vegetal steel,” with clear environmental appeal. Lighter than steel but five times stronger than concrete, bamboo is native to every continent except Europe and Antarctica.

And unlike slow-to-harvest timber, bamboo’s woody stalks can shoot up several feet a day, absorbing four times as much world-warming carbon dioxide. “The relationship to weight and resistance is the best in the world. Anything built with steel, I can do in bamboo faster and just as cheaply,” said Colombian architect Simon Velez.

(Excerpt of article by NBCNEWS.com. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

As the first manufacturer of certified structural grade bamboo, Lamboo Technologies is preparing for the shift in sourcing of construction materials from traditional sources such as timber to more rapidly renewable sources to meet the growing demand the future undoubtedly will bring. Although bamboo grows remarkably fast and requires much less effort to replenish it is still a natural resource that we must protect and use wisely if it is to be implemented as a sustainable alternative to timber. Lamboo is working internationally to cultivate land management programs across the globe to ensure that bamboo as a resource will one day reach its potential and avoid misuse that can damage the ecosystems where this remarkable plant species grows.
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To learn more about sustainability efforts Lamboo is involved in please visit our website here.
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For additional information about Lamboo certifications including the recent inclusion of LVB (Laminated Veneer Bamboo) in the 2012 Annual Book of ASTM Standards sign up for updates using our “Follow By Email” box at the top right hand side of this page.
For questions regarding Lamboo, our products, or to schedule an interview please
visit our website at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

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“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison