Engineered Bamboo Solar Structures by Lamboo Technologies


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Lamboo Technologies manufactures architectural solar structures to complement your desire for alternative solar energy generation with renewable engineered bamboo materials and intelligent solar functions for grid ancillary services, Lamboo provides advanced design and aesthetics to actualize your vision. As such, Lamboo stands ready to provide you with tailored architectural and engineering expertise necessary to realize your commissioned project.

The world is evolving into a future where our homes and workplaces are becoming an integral part of renewable energy systems. Photovoltaic solar structures remain vital to distributed power systems in our pursuit of clean, renewable energy. Both small-scale and large-scale solar installations can fundamentally shift our dependence away from fossil fuels to create healthier, more resilient, and adaptive societies. Lamboo believes the dawning of a carbon-free world is approaching, and we want to help everyone orchestrate this possibility.

Lamboo® Solar™ Structures:

Lamboo® Sunshade Systems

Lamboo sunshade systems are ideally suited for forward-thinking businesses and homeowners that want the connection between renewable energy independence and increased wellness. Our research has shown that corporations investing in solar energy with shading capacity have greater employee retention, larger candidate pools, and augmented levels of worker satisfaction. Lamboo sunshade systems are high-performance solar generators that simultaneously provide a cooling area where employees or homeowners can refresh themselves outside while protecting themselves from the elements within break areas, play areas, parks and similar.

Lamboo® Automotive Charging Stations

The evolution of automobile transportation is electric, and you have the power to decide the source of that energy. With the Lamboo solar station you can drive on the rays of the sun. Crafted as the ultimate source in solar energy and aesthetics, Lamboo merges the renewable energy needs of a conscious consumer with the design of an astute connoisseur. To accomplish this perfection, Lamboo is manufactured with engineered bamboo materials, performance solar panels, and regional fabrication and installation. It is ideal for smaller-scale applications such as light commercial brands such as hotels, residential structures/multifamily, condos, resorts and businesses looking to provide one or several charging options.

Lamboo® Canopy Systems

Lamboo canopies represent our large-scale solar option perfect for broad spaces. Lamboo Solar canopies are ideal for parking lots where companies want to turn previously unproductive areas into ones that generate electricity, add weather protection, and lower the asphalt temperatures for employee comfort, but specifically offset energy requirements for adjacent buildings/infrastructure. We want companies to re-imagine the positive impact they can have on their financials, local standing, and worldwide profile by incorporating Lamboo Solar canopies.

LAMBOO® SOLAR™ STRUCTURES – Systems, Structural Systems and Components are available internationally through our certified distributors, fabricators, and installers.

Please contact us for more information on pricing and delivery of full systems with or without installation.
info@lamboo.us
Tel: +1-866-966-2999

Vital tool to support timber use in construction


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Aiming to position timber as a first-choice ‘primary and preferred construction material’, Wood First Plus will provide evidence of the credentials of timber from cradle to grave.

Work has begun to create a free online information hub containing all of the environmental and design data necessary for project managers, designers and architects to specify timber as a first choice material.

The hub will be called Wood First Plus, and has been organized by Wood for Good, the UK timber industry promotion and sustainability group, supported by Scottish Enterprise, the Timber Trade Federation, Forestry Commission Scotland and the Timber Research and Development Association.

Building on the arguments of the Wood First campaign, which aims to position timber as a first-choice ‘primary and preferred construction material’, Wood First Plus will provide evidence of the credentials of timber from cradle to grave.

The project is a result of on-going consultation with timber industry organizations and external stakeholders, including contractors groups, architects, professional institutions and many others.

All stakeholders will be able to access whole-life information on timber products free of charge through a dedicated website, managed by Wood for Good.

Individual timber companies will be able to use this data as a basis to develop specific environmental product declarations (EPD) for their products to guarantee their sustainability and traceability.

David Hopkins, Wood for Good’s head of external communications, said: “With the built environment sector now firmly focused on delivering low-carbon, sustainable buildings, being able to quantify the environmental impact of construction materials is becoming increasingly important.

“The aim for Wood First Plus is to provide empirical evidence on the performance of specific wood products, making it easier for construction professionals wishing to build with timber to do so, and helping them to adhere to industry regulations. We look forward to announcing the first set of results later this year.”

The use of wood in construction brings numerous benefits for the environment, the economy, and the community. Trees absorb CO2 and store it, and when used in construction form an important store of atmospheric carbon, helping to limit global warming.

With sustainably managed forests and increased use of timber in construction it is an endlessly renewable process.

Additionally, wood has good thermal performance properties, increasing the energy efficiency and operational performance of a building. Timber framed buildings are often quicker to erect saving on construction cost.

The organization is also calling for a ‘Wood First’ stipulation in planning guidance that would require wood to be considered, where feasible, as the primary construction material in all publicly-funded new build and refurbishment projects, from housing to bridges to schools.

PE International has been engaged to oversee the collection, analysis and review of all life cycle assessment (LCA) data for a wide range of timber and timber products that will be used in the online tool.

The company has extensive experience in the construction materials sector and in working with the timber industry, having previously completed a major LCA project on US hardwood lumber for the American Hardwood Export Council.

(Excerpt of article from Link2. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                

As more and more organizations return to the basics and look for sustainable options in their projects, the demand for renewable resources such as wood will grow exponentially. Often overlooked by mainstream architecture, is an ancient building material that can meet these demands, bamboo. As a rapidly renewable, high performance, material bamboo can be integrated with other bio based (or renewable) materials to provide truly sustainable buildings and products. Bamboo has a wealth of environmental and performance attributes that make it ideal for the construction and retail markets.

Other articles of interest:

Wood’s New Wave
Evolving Building Codes: Wood Revolution
The Virtues of Bamboo
Bamboo Architecture and Construction
What Can Bamboo Do About CO2?
Bamboo As A Carbon Offset: INBAR Does The Math
Can bamboo tackle environmental and poverty concerns?
In Africa’s Vanishing Forests, the Benefits of Bamboo
Nigeria Can Generate 24 Million Jobs From Bamboo Production

Bamboo As A Carbon Offset: INBAR Does The Math


b2ap3_thumbnail_inbar-international-network-for-bamboo-rattan-logoCarbon credits are certificates that represent a reduction of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These reductions are accomplished by projects designed to prevent the generation of greenhouse gases: they range from windmill farms to geothermal energy projects to biomass alternative energy initiatives to reforestation.

INBAR has taken the reforestation project and put their own bamboo spin on it for Chinese companies. Carbon credits in the form of bamboo plantation investments are now available for companies.

With so many options available, with so many projects, with traditional hardwood forestry as an option, why invest in bamboo?

  • It grows up to four feet per day so it can be harvested every 4-5 years as opposed to the 25-70 years it can take for traditional hardwoods to mature.
  • It removes CO2 from the air and produces over 30% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of hardwood trees.
  • Below the ground, bamboo’s roots help prevent soil erosion.
  • Bamboo improves soil quality. The roots remove excess nitrogen and because the plant grows readily with no use of pesticides, fertilizers or herbicides, there is no ground pollution involved.
  • Environmentalists are researching bamboo’s apparent ability to soak up excess nutrients in waste water as an answer to waste issues.

With all these environmentally-friendly qualities, what has kept bamboo off the carbon offset table?

Very simply, a lack of math. Because bamboo plants have very different growth characteristics than trees, different mechanisms were needed to measure their carbon outputs. And before now, there was no way to determine how much carbon a bamboo plant can convert.

Thanks to INBAR, the China Green Carbon Foundation and the Zhejiang Agriculture, a methodology now exists that can calculate the amount of carbon available in the massive bamboo plantations in China. (Well, they actually only account for 2.8% of China’s total forest area but considering the land mass of China, that is a significant chunk.)

“This is a really big breakthrough,” said Yannick Kuehl, a climate change expert at INBAR who helped develop the technique. “This means that now bamboo is recognized as carbon offset, and as a tool for climate change mitigation measures.”

According to Kuehl, more than 10 Chinese companies have pre-ordered carbon credits and the money they pay will go towards planting new bamboo forests in China. In a country plagued with environmental issues, utilizing the sustainable bamboo plant is a positive step.

(Excerpt of article from Green Earth News. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Possible LEED Credits 

  • MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials
  • b2ap3_thumbnail_bamboo-forest_20130626-193234_1IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials
  • ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design (Environmentally Preferable Material)
  • ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design (Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact)
  • FSC Certification – Available Upon Request

Learn more about Lamboo

Applicable LEED Points

What Can Bamboo Do About CO2?


Efforts to thoroughly study the role that plants play in climate change mitigation are increasing. Most researchers focus on the promise of large, leafy forest trees to help remove carbon from the atmosphere. This is because, generally speaking, the bigger the plant, the more CO2 it absorbs – and trees are the most obvious large plant species. However, there are some very large non-tree plants in the world and increasing evidence points to a surprising grassy climate change warrior: bamboo.

One species of bamboo, the Guadua Angustifolia, found in Venezuela, Ecuador, and Colombia, has been shown to grow up to 25 meters in height and 22 centimeters in diameter, with each plant weighing up to 100 kilograms. This doesn’t match the stature of many trees, but it is still big enough to be significant. It is not all about size, however. How fast a plant grows has a part in determining how much CO2 it can absorb in a given time. In this respect, bamboo wins hands-down: it grows faster than many trees, growing up to 1.2 meters per day. In fact, bamboo holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s fastest growing plant.

Bamboo’s other advantage is that it has great strength and flexibility, making it an ideal low-cost building material in many parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, areas where it is native. This means that bamboo in a plantation can regularly be chopped down and used to build houses and other structures, where the carbon remains sequestered for an average of 80 years, and that the plantation will recover quickly due to the fast growth rate. Because of this, the World Bank recently financed a project in Ecuador proposed by the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), an intergovernmental organization dedicated to improving the livelihoods of the poor producers and users of bamboo and rattan. The project is called ‘Elevated bamboo houses to protect communities in flood zones’ and has so far succeeded in developing and implementing techniques to construct ecological flood-resistant housing for low-income families using a type of bamboo that is native to Ecuador.

(READ FULL STORY)

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The Future Wave of Green Buildings


Green buildings is on a rise to be a mainstay in Southeast Asia and proving its value at BEX Asia

Sustainability has changed business practices in Southeast Asia greatly. Three companies in Singapore have made it to the exclusive Global 100 list, which consists of the world’s most sustainable companies. The companies are City Developments Limited (CDL), CapitaLand and StarHub.

In Singapore, the building sector is one of the biggest contributors to carbon emission. Therefore, developers and businesses are increasingly aware of the need to not just implement sustainable business practices, but also to influence their stakeholders.

Singapore is among the leading cities in skyrise greening with over 50 hectares of rooftop greenery in public and private buildings.

The Housing Development Board has also come up with labour saving technology like the Prefabricated Extensive Greening roof system, which allows plants to thrive without irrigation and uses lightweight plastic trays which are easy to install.

Other countries in the region are also expected to invest in the green movement.

In Thailand, USD13 billion may be needed over two decades by the energy efficiency and green construction sector. This conclusion comes after a report on energy efficiency spending between 2003 and 2011. Currently the sector is anticipating the positive effect of energy efficiency, green building standards and certification which will drive growth in the industry. Also the Philippines is positioning itself as the regional hub of multinational corporations (MNCs), and the demand for environment-friendly smart buildings is gaining traction. A third of MNCs want their local headquarters in an “intelligent,” eco-friendly skyscraper. This was revealed by architects, urban planners, a real estate expert and a consultant for environment sustainable structures.

While in Malaysia, the government is currently working on a plan to convert all light bulbs in Government buildings to energy-saving bulbs. The Malaysian Government spends RM2.7bil a year on energy costs, and this does not include the electricity bill for statutory bodies. It is expected that the Government can save an estimated of at least RM800mil across the board if they switched to LED lighting.

Although the role of policymakers and government officers is central in driving the building and construction industry to design and develop green buildings, it is a three prong approach – where government, building professionals and the community, all play an integral part.

All this and more will be discussed at the International Green Building Conference (IGBC) 2013, held in conjunction with BEX Asia 2013 on the 11-13 September 2013 at the Marina Bay Sands, and is supported by the Building and Construction Authority (BCA) and Singapore Green Building Council (SGBC). BCA will also unveil the 3rd Green Building Masterplan, launch new Green Mark Schemes and latest updates on Green Mark at IGBC 2013.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article from EcoSeed. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Lamboo is working internationally to promote sustainability through the use of green practices and building materials with the integration of bamboo into building and manufacturing markets. Bamboo is a remarkable plant that has a plethora of green benefits. Additionally in it’s engineered form (Laminated Veneer Bamboo, LVB) bamboo based products and systems far exceed other materials both in performance and longevity.

Learn more about Lamboo

What is Lamboo?

Certifications

Product Information

Research

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

Wood’s New Wave


Wood derived from responsibly managed forests is gaining traction among eco-friendly designers as the preferred building material primarily because the source is renewable and greatly offsets a project’s initial carbon footprint.

Unlike steel and concrete, both of which generate varying amounts of carbon during production, trees absorb carbon from the atmosphere as they grow and permanently sequester it in their fibers unless they rot or burn. Concurrently, advances in software and manufacturing technologies, coupled with innovative assembly techniques, are making it technically possible to quickly and economically design and build iconic shapes and large-scale buildings with wood-based products. Europe and, more recently, Canada are leading the way, but proponents believe that the approach will become more widespread as manufacturers ramp up production capability and building officials reassess outdated codes.

The caveat is that the wood must be sourced from responsibly managed forests. “We are not talking about clear-cutting,” stresses Peter Busby, managing director of the San Francisco office of Perkins+Will. He notes that the relatively recent increase in availability of sustainably harvested woods at reasonable prices makes environmentally minded practitioners feel more comfortable about specifying wood today.

Perkins+Will developed a highly organic design based on a native orchid for the new visitor center at the VanDusen Botanical Garden in Vancouver.

Resource Management

Because natural lumber is limited in size, and the long-term preservation of our forests is yet another environmental priority, architects working on larger projects are increasingly turning to engineered-wood products to obtain the structural dimensions they need while lowering a building’s carbon footprint.

According to Karsh, it can take hundreds of years for a tree to grow large enough to supply solid-wood timber for traditional post-and-beam construction, whereas it takes about 40 years for a tree to supply the 2x6s that are typically used to manufacture glue-laminated timber, or glu-lam, an engineered-wood product that has been on the market for decades. And it takes only about 10 to 15 years to grow the trees used to produce wood chips for laminated-strand lumber (LSL), another common engineered product. When the life cycle of timber production is shortened, our forests become more productive. “If we manage our forests responsibility, which includes generating products that have a shorter renewal period, we don’t risk depleting our forests,” states Karsh.

Engineered woods have many other benefits as well, notes Nabih Tahan, chief sustainable officer of CREE Buildings in San Francisco. For example, they can be manufactured to desired performance standards; are very stable, so they will not twist or shrink; and can be cut to very fine tolerances so components will fit together exactly in the field.

Looking Ahead

Proponents of large-scale wood construction cite outdated building codes as one of the biggest barriers to this new approach. Most codes limit the height of wood-constructed buildings out of concerns about fire. But these codes were written primarily with stick-frame construction in mind; that functions very differently than mass-timber construction in a fire. While thin wood members will burn quickly, the exterior of massive timber will burn for a bit but then create a layer of char that insulates the remaining interior wood from damage. Furthermore, many of today’s fire codes were written decades ago, before fire sprinklers and computer-controlled fire-monitoring systems were developed. “Those advances change how we look at fire,” notes Karsh. Practitioners working on large-scale wood projects in Canada indicate that they must currently provide equivalency reports to satisfy the code, but Karsh believes that will likely change with the next iteration of Canada’s National Building Code, scheduled for 2015.

Another barrier, at least in North America, is a shortage of manufacturers. According to Podesto of Woodworks, only three companies make structural-grade CLT in Canada, and none in the United States.

But Karsh is not deterred, noting that it took decades for steel and concrete to evolve into the modern systems we use today. “Modern wood construction is 100 to 120 years behind. Only in the last 20 years have we developed it into a truly modern construction material.” He believes the product will become more sustainable in the years ahead. “The idea of building high-rise timber may seem crazy now, but it won’t in five to 10 years.”

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Nancy B. Solomon, AIA from Architectural Record. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

As the world leader in the industrialization of bamboo, Lamboo is striving to implement Laminated Veneer Bamboo (LVB), a rapidly renewable construction material. Through species selection, patented adhesives, and manufacturing processes Lamboo is able to create bamboo panels and components that far exceed traditional timber’s performance in nearly every aspect.

Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as a environmentally friendly and structurally stable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Testing and forecasting by experts has led to Bamboo being referred to as “the next super material” due to it’s amazing attributes and resiliency.

Lamboo Structural Component

Learn more about Lamboo

What is Lamboo?

Certifications

Product Information

Research

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

‘Green’ Buildings Gaining Status


The commercial real estate construction and investment philosophy that places a premium on location and quality is giving way to interest in sustainable design, according to market analysts. A focus on ‘green’ development, particularly with refurbishment efforts and new construction of iconic buildings in New York City, is drawing more attention to the benefits of an eco-friendly focus that include lower operating costs and long-term savings as energy prices rise. Investors are now looking to build green portfolios, which is also encouraging more builders to lean in that direction. For more on this continue reading the following article from National Real Estate Investor.

Sustainable buildings result in lower operating costs, not to mention long-term savings as the cost of energy continues to rise. Many real estate scions are building green—think of the Durst Organization’s Bank of America Tower in New York City and One World Trade Center, which is being co-developed by Durst and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey—as well as retrofitting green—most famously, Malkin Properties’ newly refurbished Empire State Building.

So it isn’t surprising that some investors and real estate firms are starting to focus on amassing green portfolios. But when will sustainability become as standard a criterion as location and quality in U.S. investors’ acquisitions? According to many within the industry, thanks to a growing awareness of green as well as several benchmarking programs, that day is almost here.

Many public pension funds and some private pension funds are interested in being environmentally responsible, says Real Capital Analytics Managing Director Dan Fasulo. But “the only real green buildings are brand new buildings built to the U.S. Green Buildings Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards. While these buildings are becoming more common, especially in the major markets, it’s still very uncommon for them to be up for sale.”

On a green mission

One investor that’s got a green investment thesis is 5 Stone Green Capital LLC, an organization founded in 2010 in New York City by Doug Lawrence and Lewis Jones, both former JP Morgan managing directors with 34 years of experience between them. The firm is on a mission not only to amass a green multifamily portfolio but to have a positive social impact.

“We have a very simple demographic model,” says Lawrence. “If there are going to be 9 billion people on the planet in 2050, you’ve got to feed them, house them, find them work and they’re going to need more energy.”

5 Stone targets investors who have an interest in green projects and products, including large and small companies, endowments and foundations. “We’ve identified broadly what we call ‘impact investors’—it’s a whole category that we want to tap into,” says Jones.

The firm’s mission is to provide a “triple bottom line” to its investors, says Lawrence. “Our investment thesis provides immediate value creation—by our energy efficiency, sustainable design, lower consumption levels of energy and use of technology, we reduce operating expenses and capital expenditures.”

Bring on the benchmarks

Early on in the USGBC’s LEED rating program, launched in 1998, “investors were seeking so-called green funds,” says Gary Holtzer, global sustainability officer with global real estate firm Hines, “Now it is generally accepted that development will be green and that the best-in-class managers will pursue a sustainable course. The good news is that sustainability is increasingly becoming a baseline, and those that do not pursue this path will suffer a ‘brown discount.’”

Europe’s Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark (GRESB) rating system is also pushing investors toward green buildings. The system is used by investors to determine the sustainability of properties they are acquiring. An external group rates the funds for potential investors.

“At the bottom level, you’re being required to demonstrate your energy efficiency in the marketplace and at the top level funds are being evaluated based on a number of characteristics, so building users are seeing the push toward sustainability from both sides,” Pogue says. “Do users care about this? More and more we’re seeing this is true.”

At press time, yet another benchmark, the FTSE NAREIT USGBC Green Real Estate Index, was about to be launched. The product of collaboration between the economic indexing firm FTSE Group, NAREIT and the USGBC, the indices, which so far include 78 publicly traded REITs, will provide investors with a credible set of criteria for identifying an environmentally responsible property using constantly updated data that goes back to 2008. The methodology utilizes both LEED and Energy Star designations. All information is validated by a third party.

Many green drivers

The shift toward sustainability began in earnest with the Government Services Administration (GSA) requiring LEED Silver certification for all new construction federal lease properties of more than 10,000 sq. ft. In 2011, the GSA upped its requirements by requiring projects funded prior to 2010 to be LEED Gold certified. With a portfolio of over 361 million sq. ft. of space in 9,600 federally owned and leased facilities, according to the GSA Web site, the GSA has significantly influenced the trend toward LEED.

“The GSA was an important early adopter because, with very long-term occupants toward perpetuity, this was a pretty big demonstration of what LEED can do,” says David Lynn, executive vice president and chief investment strategist with Cole Real Estate Investments. “But I don’t think the demonstration factor is so important anymore. I think everyone has got religion at this point. People thought it wouldn’t catch on in triple net lease buildings, but it’s even catching on there, too. Major investors see LEED as the future going forward.”

Today the drive toward green investment is being driven largely by multinational corporations, says Dan Probst, Jones Lang LaSalle’s chairman of energy and sustainability services and a founding member of its global environmental sustainability board. He says JLL’s large corporate clients—such as Bank of America, Proctor & Gamble, HSBC and Yahoo—“are very progressive on the environmental front; they’ve had strong focus for a long time on improving the buildings that they own and in which they house their employees.”

(Excerpt of article by Susan Piperato of NuWire Investor . NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

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In this new era of green construction the industry will have to search and develop innovative practices and materials to replace traditional forms that are no longer sustainable. Bamboo is an example of one of these new ultra renewable resources that will be looked towards as a solution.

Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as a environmentally friendly structurally stable renewable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50) and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Learn more about the amazing attributes of bamboo here.

LEED Credits available through Lamboo integration.

Incorporating Lamboo (LVB) Laminated Veneer Bamboo into projects can earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification under the following:

  • MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials
  • IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials
  • ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design
    (Environmentally Preferable Material)
  • ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design
    (Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact)
  • FSC Certification – Available Upon Request

Learn more about our certifications here.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated


Blog by: Dustin Dennison

The Evolution of Green Construction


The homes we live in create a huge carbon debt before the proud new owners ever cross the threshold. But even worse is the fact that they are built in such a way that they will continue to do harm once they are inhabited, thanks to inadequate insulation that leaves homeowners cranking the heat and AC, not to mention a complete lack of sustainable energy options. Luckily, there is a bright spot on the horizon, and it comes in the form of green construction.

The average construction site could be described as less than eco-friendly, to put it mildly. The materials used for such projects often include natural resources like wood and stone that are not harvested in a sustainable manner. Both logging and mining operations are notorious for damaging the environment through their efforts and doing very little to clean up afterwards. Further, these materials are frequently shipped all over the globe, creating massive amounts of pollution along every step of the way, not to mention the manufacturing processes, which produce even more pollution and waste.

And then, of course, there is the construction itself, which continues this assault on the environment. In short, the homes we live in create a huge carbon debt before the proud new owners ever cross the threshold. But even worse is the fact that they are built in such a way that they will continue to do harm once they are inhabited, thanks to inadequate insulation that leaves homeowners cranking the heat and AC, not to mention a complete lack of sustainable energy options. Luckily, there is a bright spot on the horizon, and it comes in the form of green construction.

Over the last several years, a rapidly growing awareness of serious environmental issues (pollution, deforestation, global warming, habitat loss, species extinction, etc.) has led the public to call for alternatives to the products and services they use on a daily basis. And since many consumers start in the home, the demand for green options on this front has grown considerably. In response, the construction industry has begun to realize a shift in practices, not as a whole, but at least in part, with companies springing up that provide eco-friendly options in the building process.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by EcoCltr.)

CTW-structural-system

Environmental concerns have initiated efforts by organizations of all kinds from the private or public sector as well as government bodies to develop renewable practices and materials to replace declining or unsustainable resources. Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as an environmentally friendly, structurally stable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50) and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Lamboo’s LVB (Laminated Veneer Bamboo) also represents one of the highest performing building materials available to the industry. Learn more about Lamboo’s attributes here.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison