Lamboo Wins Governor’s Export Award


On July 31st, 2013 Lamboo was honored by Illinois Governor Pat Quinn as the recipient for the 2013 Illinois Governor’s Export Award in the Emerging/New Export Business category.

Pat-Quinn-Govenors-Export-Award-Lamboo

Pictured Left, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn, congratulating Lamboo, Inc. President and CEO, Luke Schuette (Right), at the award ceremony for 2013 Illinois Governor’s Export Award on July 31st, 2013. Lamboo received the honor in the Emerging/New Export Business category.

The award recognizes the rapid growth of Lamboo’s export sales in 2012 by 63 percent over 2011. 27 percent of the company’s total sales are now attributed to exports.

“We are immensely proud to receive this award,” said Luke Schuette, founder and president of Lamboo. “The award is testimony to the growing global recognition of Lamboo as a high-performance brand and the growing interest in bamboo as a sustainable raw material for green building and design applications.”

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn handed out the award at a ceremony in Chicago.

“Lamboo’s vision is to combine high-performance technology with sustainability,” said Schuette. “We see great potential for growth as the green building and ecological innovation wave within primary industries continues to spread across the globe.”

For further information, please contact Henrik Rasmussen at 202-403-4240 or henrik@lamboo.us.

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Solar Decathlon China


The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon (SD) is an award-winning program that challenges collegiate teams to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. The resulting homes demonstrate to students, the public and industry, that solar-powered houses are fully functional, comfortable and sustainable living spaces. SD aims to promote collaboration in the solar industry and to facilitate innovation and adoption of solar energy and energy-efficiency technologies.

During the competition, the energy consumed by each house is generated by solar energy solutions. The competition will assess the team’s ability to conserve energy, control their physical environment and ability to be fully energy sufficient. Modeled after the Olympic decathlon competition, each home will be evaluated on their performance in ten contests.

Since the launch of the Solar Decathlon in 2002, six subsequent competitions have been hosted in the U.S. and Europe, involving over 100 collegiate teams. The competition demonstrates innovation in the solar industry’s innovation and identifies immediately viable technologies.

In Washington D.C., on the afternoon of January 18, 2011, China’s National Energy Administration (NEA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Peking University (PKU) and Applied Materials signed the Solar Decathlon China (SD China) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), launching this premier international competition for the first time in Asia as one of the Sino-US energy collaborative programs.

(READ FULL STORY)

LEED: Changing the built world for the better


The sustainable (green) building movement is a major trend in design and construction of commercial and public buildings. The United States Green Building Council has coordinated the establishment and evolution of a national consensus effort to provide the industry with the tools necessary to design, build and operate buildings that deliver high performance inside and outside the building footprint.

They have developed the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design standard, which is a rating system based on optimum site selection and sustainability, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere optimization, materials and resources (renewable and recyclable base), and indoor environmental quality. The LEED process is a systematic approach where building design and construction needs to meet various requirements in the five segments to reach a certain rating level, and LEED certification is voluntary. Whether it be a school, library, government building or your office, you probably have been in a LEED building.

All people in the building industry are looking for ways to adapt to this changing environment in the private and public sectors. We know that buildings consume annually more than 30 percent of the nation’s total energy, and more than 60 percent of the electricity. Research has demonstrated that green design measures in new buildings reduce operating costs, enhance building marketability, increase worker productivity and reduce potential liability resulting from indoor air quality problems.

(READ FULL STORY)

building-impacts_why-build-green

What Can Bamboo Do About CO2?


Efforts to thoroughly study the role that plants play in climate change mitigation are increasing. Most researchers focus on the promise of large, leafy forest trees to help remove carbon from the atmosphere. This is because, generally speaking, the bigger the plant, the more CO2 it absorbs – and trees are the most obvious large plant species. However, there are some very large non-tree plants in the world and increasing evidence points to a surprising grassy climate change warrior: bamboo.

One species of bamboo, the Guadua Angustifolia, found in Venezuela, Ecuador, and Colombia, has been shown to grow up to 25 meters in height and 22 centimeters in diameter, with each plant weighing up to 100 kilograms. This doesn’t match the stature of many trees, but it is still big enough to be significant. It is not all about size, however. How fast a plant grows has a part in determining how much CO2 it can absorb in a given time. In this respect, bamboo wins hands-down: it grows faster than many trees, growing up to 1.2 meters per day. In fact, bamboo holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s fastest growing plant.

Bamboo’s other advantage is that it has great strength and flexibility, making it an ideal low-cost building material in many parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, areas where it is native. This means that bamboo in a plantation can regularly be chopped down and used to build houses and other structures, where the carbon remains sequestered for an average of 80 years, and that the plantation will recover quickly due to the fast growth rate. Because of this, the World Bank recently financed a project in Ecuador proposed by the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), an intergovernmental organization dedicated to improving the livelihoods of the poor producers and users of bamboo and rattan. The project is called ‘Elevated bamboo houses to protect communities in flood zones’ and has so far succeeded in developing and implementing techniques to construct ecological flood-resistant housing for low-income families using a type of bamboo that is native to Ecuador.

(READ FULL STORY)

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Sustainability in Construction of the Future


Facing the numerous challenges related to sustainability, many research works and experiments are conducted to develop innovative concepts, technologies and construction systems.

In order to identify the key perspectives of this domain, the magazine Habitation publishes an article on the construction of the future, including an interview of Professor Emmanuel Rey of the Laboratory of Architecture and Sustainable Technologies (LAST).

Among the numerous innovations currently under development in the built environment, some tendencies can be emphasized and grouped according to four research axes, which meet the work in which the LAST is presently involved.

Symbiotic neighborhoods.

This third generation of sustainable neighborhoods will borrow principles from industrial ecology to further develop synergies and resource exchanges at the scale of a neighborhood.

Rebuild with flexibility.

Much more than imagining a new ideal city in the middle of the fields, it is necessary, especially in Europe, to determine the optimal way to upgrade existing towns and cities. A key issue will therefore be the renovation, transformation and replacement of existing buildings.

New energy paradigms.

The first efficiency measure always consists in decreasing the needs. This reality is going to make bioclimatic strategies essential, taking into account an increasing number of parameters: passive solar energy and natural light, natural ventilation and passive cooling, weighing the interests of urban densification and quality of life. Integrated design of renewable energy system will also play an increasing role in the next decades.

Recyclable housing.

These enhancements will help the growing, in energy balances, of the importance of grey energy. This will promote, in Switzerland, the use of local resources such as wood, but also to innovate in the field of hybrid construction systems, which combine several materials taking advantage of the characteristics of each. Another major axis is the recovery of construction materials. “Today’s buildings are mines for those of tomorrow. We begin to think about improved dissociated building systems which can reduce construction wastes and anticipate their treatment at the time of deconstruction” explains Prof. Emmanuel Rey.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article from Azobuild. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Lamboo, Laminated Veneer Bamboo (LVB), is a superior performing sustainable alternative that many will look towards to meet the Sustainable Technology needs of the future. Lamboo is leading the international effort of the industrialization of bamboo materials in both the public and private sectors. Bamboo is unmatched in its strength and longevity as a building material and is one of the fastest growing plant species on the planet. Lamboo is working with a number of distinguished organizations and universities to gain certifications and recognition for the potential role bamboo has in our future. To learn more about these efforts please view our Research and Product Information pages. Stay connected for updates on the growth of bamboo construction as exciting studies are being carried out through the organizations such as the USGBC, and Universities worldwide like the University of Cambridge and Oregon. Updates will be posted in the coming weeks!

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated

Blog by: Dustin Dennison

Can bamboo tackle environmental and poverty concerns?


HONG KONG, China (CNN) — Bamboo, considered to be the world’s fastest-growing woody plant, could be a key component in lifting thousands of people in the developing world out of poverty.

According to the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), as many as 1.5 billion people currently “depend in some way on bamboo and rattan,” and several organizations are now investigating how growing bamboo in economically deprived areas can boost the income of the residents, particularly small-scale farmers.

One of them is Hanoi, Vietnam-based Prosperity Initiative (PI). Many people can escape poverty by increasing bamboo production in rural areas and by linking local communities with domestic and foreign buyers, the non-governmental organization believes.

PI aims to bolster the Mekong region’s bamboo industry sufficiently enough to bring 750,000 people out of poverty by 2020. It sounds a tall order, but Tim de Mestre, head of Prosperity Initiative’s Mekong bamboo program, believes it is “both realistic and achievable.”

“Income poverty can only be solved by sustainably increasing household incomes,” de Mestre said. “The poor have two assets they can use to do this: their land, to grow commodities, and their labor.”

China currently produces 80 percent of the world’s bamboo and consumes 60 percent of it, according to PI. Smaller and poorer bamboo-producing countries such as Vietnam are in a prime position to “out-compete China” by supplying industries with raw materials at lower prices, De Mestre said.

But why would growing bamboo increase income levels any more than any other type of crop? Its advantage, proponents say, is its versatility and how quickly it can grow.

Bamboo is a genuinely renewable resource which grows extremely fast, is incredibly strong and has a vast number of practical uses — particularly in the building industry.

Around 1 billion people live in bamboo houses, according to INBAR. Deforestation of tropical forests and illegal logging will also make people search for more sustainable alternatives in the future, such as bamboo.

PI’s strategy is to refocus the bamboo industry on “higher-value products”: That is, to concentrate on producing larger items, such as flooring, furniture or building materials.

Such a tactic could drive up the value of bamboo in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, benefiting small-bamboo farmers, as well as those finding employment in the bamboo production industry.

PI says its model is already working in Vietnam, and claims bamboo price increases from 2005-2007 have already been responsible for lifting 20,000 Vietnamese out of poverty. The price of Chinese bamboo has also been boosted in recent months by the strengthening yuan.

News like that will be welcome for poor bamboo farmers as the numbers for industrial bamboo products such as flooring are particularly appealing for them, de Mestre said.

“Typically 60 percent of the sector’s output value is raw material cost.”

That means for every $1 million worth of bamboo products produced, $600,000 of it goes to the farmers growing the raw bamboo, he said.

The global bamboo industry is currently worth around $11 billion per year and is tipped to reach $15-$20 billion per year by 2018, according to PI. The market for industrial bamboo products is currently only valued at around $500 million a year, but PI estimates it could grow to $4 -5 billion in the next 10 years.

For the bamboo industry to thrive, however, it needs to find large export markets.

Currently, demand for Vietnamese bamboo products is domestic-driven. That may take some time, said Darrel DeBoer, a California-based architect who is one of the biggest proponents of bamboo usage in buildings and structures in the United States.

“It’s definitely a different way of thinking than most people are accustomed to here,” DeBoer said. From an environmental-friendly perspective, bamboo homes are attractive, said DeBoer, but not enough people in the United States are aware of the option.

“The building industry is very slow to change and you kind of have to drag them along,” he said. “We are at the very early phase of basically letting people know that it is possible.”

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Rachel Oliver of CNN. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)


 More key benefits of bamboo –

  • Produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area.
  • Growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50).
  • Root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo

Advantages of Lamboo Structural grade materials –

  • On average 20% more stable than hardwoods and up to 40% more stable than softwoods such as pine or Douglas Fir.
  • 10 times stronger than wood in tension and 3 times stronger mechanically.
  • Our manufacturing processes use 15% less embodied energy than that of engineered wood, and 300% less embodied energy than aluminum and steel.
  • Resistance to pests and termites (engineered process and high silica content).
  • Resistance to mold and fungi cultivation.
  • Low V.O.C. adhesives, no off-gassing when sanding, profiling, and handling materials.

LEED Credits available through Lamboo integration

Incorporating Lamboo (LVB) Laminated Veneer Bamboo into projects can earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification under the following:

  • MR Credit 6 – Rapidly renewable materials
  • IEQ Credit 4.4 – Low-emitting materials
  • ID Credit 1 – Innovation in Design(Environmentally Preferable Material)
  • ID Credit 2 – Innovation in Design(Life Cycle Assessment / Environmental Impact)
  • FSC Certification – Available Upon Request

Learn more about our certifications here.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us   866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison

Evolving Building Codes: Wood Revolution


Pushing the boundaries of innovative wood design and construction

There is a quiet revolution taking place within the design community. After a prolonged emphasis on concrete and steel for buildings other than homes, design professionals are using wood to great effect in a growing number of non-residential and multi-family building types—in applications that range from traditional to innovative, even iconic. Some are driven by wood’s cost effectiveness while others cite its versatility or low carbon footprint, but their collective path has been made possible by building codes that increasingly recognize wood’s structural and performance capabilities, and the continued evolution of wood building systems and techniques.

When the International Building Code (IBC) was introduced in 2000, it consolidated three regional model building codes into one uniform code that has since been adopted by most jurisdictions. It increased the possibilities for wood construction by (among other things) recognizing additional fire protection techniques, consolidating the maximum allowable areas and heights from the three legacy codes into one (thus increasing what’s allowable in some jurisdictions), and allowing the use of wood in a wider range of building types. In subsequent versions of the IBC, even more opportunities have been created where additional fire protection features are used.

Even so, the pioneering nature of building design is such that there are always architects and engineers seeking to push beyond the conventional, and it is common for project teams to require—and be granted—variances for designs not covered in the code that can nonetheless be justified on a case-by-case basis.

Wood-construction

This CEU will examine the use of wood both within the current IBC and through building projects that have further pushed the boundaries of wood design and construction.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by Continuing Education Center. NOT AFFILIATED WITH LAMBOO)

Lamboo Logo WASHOUTTimber is increasingly being recognized for its potential as a sustainable building material in an era where designers are looking for alternatives to the non-renewable resources traditionally used. We must start using options that we can replenished over time rather than using a finite resource; however, effective in terms of application and cost it ultimately may be. Many species of timber have attributes that make it ideal for construction and even though it is renewable many of these species take 25-50 years to reach maturity and require expensive and damaging replanting, threatening many weakened ecosystems. Due to these concerns, Bamboo is being used in many applications where timber has in the past providing remarkable strength, performance, and stability far exceeding any other natural materials (in addition to having a growth rate of 6-8 years). Testing and forecasting by experts has led to the coining of the term “the next super material” due to Bamboo’s amazing attributes and resiliency.

As the world leader in the industrialization of bamboo, Lamboo is striving to make this prediction a reality by manufacturing the world’s first certified structural grade bamboo component, laminated veneer bamboo (LVB). Through species selection, patented adhesives, and manufacturing processes Lamboo is able to create bamboo panels and components that far exceed wood’s performance in nearly every aspect.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison

The Evolution of Green Construction


The homes we live in create a huge carbon debt before the proud new owners ever cross the threshold. But even worse is the fact that they are built in such a way that they will continue to do harm once they are inhabited, thanks to inadequate insulation that leaves homeowners cranking the heat and AC, not to mention a complete lack of sustainable energy options. Luckily, there is a bright spot on the horizon, and it comes in the form of green construction.

The average construction site could be described as less than eco-friendly, to put it mildly. The materials used for such projects often include natural resources like wood and stone that are not harvested in a sustainable manner. Both logging and mining operations are notorious for damaging the environment through their efforts and doing very little to clean up afterwards. Further, these materials are frequently shipped all over the globe, creating massive amounts of pollution along every step of the way, not to mention the manufacturing processes, which produce even more pollution and waste.

And then, of course, there is the construction itself, which continues this assault on the environment. In short, the homes we live in create a huge carbon debt before the proud new owners ever cross the threshold. But even worse is the fact that they are built in such a way that they will continue to do harm once they are inhabited, thanks to inadequate insulation that leaves homeowners cranking the heat and AC, not to mention a complete lack of sustainable energy options. Luckily, there is a bright spot on the horizon, and it comes in the form of green construction.

Over the last several years, a rapidly growing awareness of serious environmental issues (pollution, deforestation, global warming, habitat loss, species extinction, etc.) has led the public to call for alternatives to the products and services they use on a daily basis. And since many consumers start in the home, the demand for green options on this front has grown considerably. In response, the construction industry has begun to realize a shift in practices, not as a whole, but at least in part, with companies springing up that provide eco-friendly options in the building process.

(Read More)

(Excerpt of article by EcoCltr.)

CTW-structural-system

Environmental concerns have initiated efforts by organizations of all kinds from the private or public sector as well as government bodies to develop renewable practices and materials to replace declining or unsustainable resources. Bamboo as a resource is unmatched in its potential as an environmentally friendly, structurally stable building material. Bamboo produces 30% more oxygen and sequesters 35% more carbon than a like sized timber forest area. With a growth rate of 6-8 years to maturity (compared to timber 25-50) and root structure that eliminates the need for replanting bamboo can be produced on a large scale with much more ease than timber forests cutting costs and limiting energy consumption. Lamboo’s LVB (Laminated Veneer Bamboo) also represents one of the highest performing building materials available to the industry. Learn more about Lamboo’s attributes here.

For questions regarding Lamboo or our products please visit our website
at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison

 

AEC Daily Continuing Education – Lamboo


AEC Daily is a developer of online education courses for the construction and architecture industries. It is an e-learning provider for architects, engineers, and other construction professionals and serves over 450 companies.

Founded in 2001, online education courses are the main field of AEC Daily. They provide over 300 courses with a focus on sustainable design. Most courses are free while there is a submission fee for courses like the virtual tour of the USGBC headquarters. AEC Daily won the highest award in education from the American Institute of Architects in 2009 and continue to attract the highest numbers of design professionals in the industry. AEC Daily has been recognized as the common denominator for education in the AEC industry.

Lamboo offers a course covering laminated veneer bamboo (LVB) use in structural and curtain wall applications. This course compares the structural and mechanical properties of common building materials and composites, and illustrates how LVB components can be fully integrated into structural or curtain wall designs and meet the requirements of today’s sustainable built environment. Additional courses for window & door and interior panels will be added in coming months.

(View PDF)

2012 Greenbuild Conference & Expo!


Greenbuild is the world’s largest conference and expo dedicated to green building.

Thousands of building professionals from all over the world come together at Greenbuild for three days of outstanding educational sessions, renowned speakers, green building tours, special seminars, and networking events.

Launched in 2002, Greenbuild is a great opportunity to build new relationships and connect with colleagues from throughout the industry and around the world.

The U.S. Green Building Council is hosting Greenbuild 2012 in San Francisco from Nov. 14-16. This year will be focused on bringing technology and sustainability together in the global green movement.

U.S. Green Building Council

The U.S. Green Building Council was established in 1993 and has grown to be a diverse group of builders and environmentalists, corporations and nonprofits, teachers and students, lawmakers and citizens. Today there are 77 chapters, 13,000 member organizations and 181,000 LEED professionals strong that share the same vision of a sustainable built environment.

Green building is a win-win, offering both environmental and economic opportunity. Greater building efficiency can meet 85 percent of future demand for energy in the United States and a commitment to green building has the potential to generate 2.5 million jobs.

The USGBC has facilitated the establishment of the most widely recognized and widely used green building program across the globe, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). LEED is certifying 1.6 million square feet of building space each day in more than 130 countries. LEED is a certification program for buildings, homes and communities that guides the design, construction, operations and maintenance. Today, nearly 50,000 projects are currently participating in LEED, comprising more than 8.9 billion square feet of construction space.

Lamboo representatives will be attending the show this week to meet with industry leaders and all others interested in learning about the advantages Lamboo has over traditional building materials.

The following Lamboo partners will be showcasing Lamboo materials within their exhibit:

Solar Innovations, Inc.
Booth : 438S
(800) 618-0669
skylight@solarinnovations.com

NanaWall Systems, Inc.
Booth : 1127S
Travis Troen – (415) 383-3148 Ext. 229
travist@nanawall.com

C.T. Windows, Inc.

Booth : 2428S
Sunil Tarneja – (407) 857-9237
starneja@aatctw.net

Among their displays these companies will be showcasing products and components from the Lamboo® Vue™ line of Window & Doors as well as curtain wall and storefront applications from the Lamboo® Renewall™series.
  For questions regarding Lamboo, our products, or to schedule an interview please
visit our website at www.lamboo.us or contact us at info@lamboo.us 866-966-2999

“MAKING INNOVATIVE THINKING A STANDARD” – Lamboo Incorporated
Blog by: Dustin Dennison